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Crystal featured designer for Style-O-Rama Juneau Fashion Show

Style-O-Rama

By Mary Catharine Martin | Capital City Weekly

 

Juneau’s second annual Style-O-Rama, an event showcasing thirteen boutiques and three local designers, made a compelling case Nov. 5 for why Southeast Alaskans should patronize local businesses — even when they’re shopping online.

 

Style-O-Rama was conceived and first put on by Shoefly owner Sydney Mitchell in 2015; this year she and Dana Herndon of Higher Image Management joined forces.

 

“I think it’s important for Juneau women to have a fashion show showing styles relevant to Juneau,” Mitchell said. “It’s an opportunity to showcase local design talent and emerging and established designers — and, I think, it’s just a fun time.”

 

Style-O-Rama sold out for the second year in a row. Last year, it was at Heritage Coffee and had a 90-person capacity; this year it was at The Red Dog Saloon and had a 150-person capacity, Mitchell said.

 

Highlighted this year was emerging designer Crystal Worl, who is launching a women’s line of clothing at Trickster Company, the shop she owns with her brother, Rico Worl.

 

Crystal modeled a pair of her leggings featuring a Raven and fireweed design, and Trickster team member Erika Bergren modeled leggings with a Raven and lotus design. The two also modeled body jewelry inspired by formline design and “modernized Athabascan beadwork floral patterns” and bracelets. Crystal designs the jewelry and Rico engraves it. In some, she uses copper or silver Russian trading beads.

 

Crystal and Bergren also wore pashminas silkscreened with some of Crystal’s formline art and carried clutches she designed.

 

The high-waisted, stretchy pants are just the beginning of her women’s clothing line, she said. She plans seven different tops, five different leggings, and four pouches (which also function as pencil cases). There’s a wide range of prices, from $12 for a clutch to $65 for the leggings to $175 for the pashminas.

 

She’s still thinking of a name for the line, though it’ll likely have to do both with place and with time, regular themes in her work.